“Money Carlo” Match to Win Car Dealership Scam

Don’t get too excited if you receive a “winning” Money Carlo Match to Win voucher in the mail that promotes your local car dealership. The Money Carlo Match to Win game is a marketing scheme utilized by various desperate car dealerships across the United States. The Money Carlo game will claim recipients won a certain amount of cash by peeling game piece tabs and matching objects like oranges, cherries, and 7’s. The Money Carlo game piece will usually arrive in the mail alongside advertisements, promotions, and coupons.

money carlo

The way the Money Carlo “scam” works is that a person will receive the Money Carlo game card and voucher in the mail from a local car dealership. The Money Carlo game card and attached invitation or voucher states that if you match a pair you will win $25,000, $5,000, $2,000, or $100 cash; However, this does not actually mean that you won anything. A simple way to determine if you are potentially being tricked is to know that most/all of the Money Carlo game cards will typically match the numbers 777 – 777. This can sometimes be an alleged $5,000 or $100 cash prize. The Money Carlo game will state that winners must call the car dealership and supply them with a confirmation number, as well as visit the location to compare the confirmation code to the car dealership’s prize board. The game voucher claims that the prize board at your local car dealership will determine if you have won – not the actual game piece that already says that you won.

The game also states that there is a 1:45,000 chance to win but we are unable to find any reports of real Money Carlo winners. We have noticed that car dealerships who utilize this tactic have many bad reviews by frustrated potentially customers who feel duped and lied to.

We spoke with several employees and ex-employees of certain car dealerships online who strongly suggest that this as a scam and deceptive marketing ploy. They described it as a deceptive marketing scheme used to acquire potential customers. The car dealerships that utilize this tactic want you to visit their location and sell you a car. In order to get you to do this you must visit the location with your game piece in hand.

I would not go as far as most people to classify the Money Carlo game as a “full-blown” scam, but I would say that it is a very unethical marketing technique and car dealerships who participate in this marketing scheme should be punished. Telling people that they won a large amount of cash when they did not is dishonest and unethical. It’s a terrible thing to do to people, and these bad car dealerships should be ashamed of themselves. If you receive these types of games in the mail in the future you may want to throw them away before you end up wasting your time visiting a dishonest and greedy car dealership. I also recommend to leave the car dealership a bad review online, on various websites like Yelp and Google, in order to put an end to this type of marketing scheme once and for all.


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Sean Doyle

http://Botcrawl.com

Sean Doyle is an engineer from Los Angeles, California. Sean's primary focuses include Internet Security, Web Spam, and Online Marketing.

Comments ( 87 )

  1. ReplyJD Sallinger
    Team Mazda Subaru in Caldwell, Idaho sent out the same Money Carlo game mailer, with a winning 777-777 match, of course. I'm glad I read here that it is a scam, it saved me a drive over from Boise/Meridian.
  2. ReplyAnonymous
    A sad state of the auto sales industry. Spirit Dodge and Chrysler Jeep is also amongst the frauds. Located in Swedes boro, Nj. I hope they don't sell a single car during the "game" scam time. This will hurt these dealerships in the long haul. Do they not see this? Maybe if they sold more reliable cars like Honda's or Toyota's they'd be less desperate and fraudulent. Shame on you Spirit Dodge of South Jersey.
  3. ReplyAnonymous
    The car dealer below just sent my mother in law and I one those "Money Carlo" game scams each in the mail yesterday. County Ford 105 Auto Park Dr. Graham, NC. 27253 We both got matching 777 on our cards which says we each won a 50" 4K Ultra TV. I did an internet search about this game to find out more about it and quickly saw its a dirty SCAM they're pulling on EVERYONE! These scammers should be shut down.
    • ReplyAnonymous
      I also have a winning card for the TV at County Ford in Graham NC. The dealership has been giving me the run around and the company the dealership contracted to schedule the appointment to receive the prize said she wasn't going to admit that it was a scam when I called her on it. Should have known it was too good to be true! Oh well, it gave my 6 year old a moment of excitement thinking we had won a new TV!
  4. ReplyAnonymous
    Yes, add me to the list with three sevens from Sullivan Brothers. Since it looked so straight forward as stated on the game card; "if you have a matching pair you win!", I called the winners line to enter my confirmation code. The computer voice knew my name evidently by looking up my phone number, then they hit me with several personal questions such as how much money I make. I did not complete the survey but within 15 minutes I received a call from someone telling me that since I stayed at one of their resorts recently (a lie), that I won a free trip to Disney! I declined their generous offer and hung up before they could continue their non stop sales pitch. Uhhgg...
  5. ReplyImma Themma
    I too got it, got the 777, and was skeptical. I called the dealership and the receptionist sounded elusive! I felt it could be a scam and googled it! Sure enough, this site confirmed it, and I am so grateful. This sounds like a Trump-ean tactic. FOOL ME ONCE SHAME ON YOU; FOOL ME TWICE, SHAME ON YOU! No Bueno, Money Carlo!
  6. ReplyChris
    What is really shady is that they used hyphens (-) instead of the normal asterisks (*) to lead you (or rather not lead you) to the fine print. "If you have a matching pair, you win!-" That little hyphen doesn't look like anything. If there was an asterisk, it would make you want to search for the other asterisk with the rest of the information. The mailer was folded so tightly, I didn't even realize the inside had all the fine print. Jeff Wyler Chevrolet of Columbus, Ohio
  7. ReplyKari
    Hi Sean, What you may not realize is that I believe that once you go in to the dealership - they flag you and then sell your information to marketing companies who then start flooding your email address. So, even if you don't buy a car from them once they get you there, they still make money from you by selling your information to others. I have no proof, this is just my opinion based on my experiance.
  8. ReplyAnonymous
    Add: JIMMY GRANGER in Shreveport, Louisiana! Says: you now "QUALIFY" to win 1 of 4 prizes!
  9. ReplyAnonymous
    Yup, Sullivan Brothers Toyota, Kingston MA sent me one of these...you guessed it all sevens for a 5k "cash" prize.